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did nintendo steel starfox?


Guest Matt macdowel

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Guest Matt macdowel

Starfox is a video game that was published by Ariolasoft on their Reaktor label in 1987 for the ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64, and Amstrad CPC. The player assumes the role of Hawkins, a space fighter pilot charged with protecting the Hyturian star system from invading alien forces. The game uses wireframe and shaded vector graphics to depict combat, in a similar fashion to games such as Elite and Starstrike 2, which was also created by Realtime Games. Ariolosoft had previously published the Electronic Arts titles Skyfox and Arcticfox and the name was chosen to build on the success of those titles.

Starfox 1 was made in 1993 by nintendo

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Had it not been for me allready having heard of it, I'd say you were making it all up.

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Guest FoXXX

Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't that the reason why in Europe SF64 is called Lylat Wars, because there was a previous game with the title SF?

Regardless, © Nintendo stays put.

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Guest Matt macdowel

Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't that the reason why in Europe SF64 is called Lylat Wars, because there was a previous game with the title SF?

Regardless, © Nintendo stays put.

i thought that was africa? in EU its called star wing

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Guest Matt macdowel

Africa? :S

yes in some parts of africa its called Lylat wars in EU its called star wing in America its called starfox

heres a quick pick of starfox the one nintendo didn't make

%7Boption%7D

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Nintendo had to buy the name "Star Fox" from Atari so they could use the name globally without anymore problems, kinda like what Ivan Riteman had to do before he decided on "Ghostbusters".

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Guest FoXXX

Nintendo had to buy the name "Star Fox" from Atari so they could use the name globally without anymore problems, kinda like what Ivan Riteman had to do before he decided on "Ghostbusters".

Alrighty lol

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Hi,

SNES StarFox is called "Starwing" and N64 StarFox is called "Lylat Wars" here in EU, because a game licence with Starfox as brand was already registered in EU. I think Adventures and Assault could be published as StarFox, because the brand rights expired.

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Guest Matt macdowel

Nintendo had to buy the name "Star Fox" from Atari so they could use the name globally without anymore problems, kinda like what Ivan Riteman had to do before he decided on "Ghostbusters".

source?

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I don't really think Nintendo stole Starfox at all. The only problem with it was the name in Europe b/c of Starfox being used in an Atari game there. I think there was a comic with the Starfox name before the games came out too but who the fuck cares.

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To sum it all up: Nintendo made Starfox. They couldn't name it Starfox in Europe due to Copyright. Thus Europe gets Starwing and Lylat Wars. Once the copyright expired, Nintendo of Europe named the series Starfox again in Adventures.

Right now, Nintendo owns the name Starfox.

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Guest FoXXX

To sum it all up: Nintendo made Starfox. They couldn't name it Starfox in Europe due to Copyright. Thus Europe gets Starwing and Lylat Wars. Once the copyright expired, Nintendo of Europe named the series Starfox again in Adventures.

Right now, Nintendo owns the name Starfox.

...and hopefully always :D

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Methinks you guys are pretty confused about the topic that began here. I don't think Matt macdowel is referring to the very Star Fox game which you guys are thinking about at all!

In fact, he is specifically referring to a very different game called Starfox (without the space between "star" and "fox", unlike the title of Atari 2600 game which has the exact name of our beloved Star Fox game, as in Nintendo's game.)

Let me explain. In 1983, a company called Mythicon developed and released a game called Star Fox (with a space in-between) for the Atari 2600 console. This company managed to register the name of the game in Europe, but not in the United States. The company pretty much closed down before they could. The irony here they managed to release the game in the U.S., but the 1983 Star Fox never saw the light of day in Europe at all! Unfortunately, because of Mythicon's registered entry, this is why ten years later Nintendo had trouble getting the name "Star Fox" In Europe and ended up renaming the game as Starwing. Australians had to endure the same name as well, because usually PAL games tend to remain consistent when titled differently from their American and/or Japanese counter-parts.

Four years after the Atari 2600 game, in 1987, a company called Ariolasoft released a game called Starfox (without a space in-between) for the ZX Spectrum, Commodore 64, and Amstrad CPC gaming platforms. Unlike the 1983 game, this game was very much released in Europe under the very same name! It should have been in Europe, as Ariolasoft was a German company!

In this case, it is very unlikely that the 1987 game was cause for renaming Nintendo's Star Fox as Starwing! The 1983 game was the more likely cause of the renaming, but Matt macdowel wasn't referring to that game at all!

In other words, Matt macdowel is trying to find out whether Nintendo stole the name from Ariolasoft (or Mythicon). Well, I highly doubt that for many reasons. A lot of space-based games, as well as comics and movies, may likely have the term "star" in their titles (Star Wars, Star Trek, etc.), and "fox" is usual term that people tend to tag pilots and aircraft. Therefore, "star fox" is not unique at all! Furthermore, Nintendo is a Japanese company, and during those days not many people had internet to easily check up on small companies in other countries such as Ariolasoft (or Mythicon). Nintendo could have been easily very ignorant of the fact that previous games had similar names. Besides, it wouldn't matter anyway, as both companies had long shut their doors before Nintendo got to actually release our beloved Star Fox into the market, which was first in Japan before anywhere else!

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The irony here they managed to release the game in the U.S., but the 1983 Star Fox never saw the light of day in Europe at all! Unfortunately, because of Mythicon's registered entry, this is why ten years later Nintendo had trouble getting the name "Star Fox" In Europe and ended up renaming the game as Starwing.

Correction, it was renamed Lylat Wars. Although now days its called Starfox.

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both games have a similar storyline

in Star fox the one that came first was about your a pilot fighting off alien invasions

Starfox the one Nintendo made was about Rebels invading the lylat system and your pilot fighting them off!

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there very similar though.... although one you play as human and the other a fox

Well, one would imagine that a sci-fi shooter game created in days when games couldn't support the involved gameplay and storytelling that's found in today's games, would result in games being quite similar. I mean, think of most sci-fi media in general, most do have a basic story line of a race either defending themselves against aliens or rebelling against some intergalactic tyranny...

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Indeed, most sci-fi games can essentially be boiled down to "Species/group A is trying to repel species/group B"

It applies for Halo, Mass Effect, Unreal (not the tournaments, just Unreal), Duke Nukem, etc. etc.

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Indeed, most sci-fi games can essentially be boiled down to "Species/group A is trying to repel species/group B"

It applies for Halo, Mass Effect, Unreal (not the tournaments, just Unreal), Duke Nukem, etc. etc.

Second this. Countless movies follow that simple recipe as well.

That was also one of the reasons I found Camerons Avatar interesting. For once, the humans were the invaders, which was a somewhat interesting twist.

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Well, one would imagine that a sci-fi shooter game created in days when games couldn't support the involved gameplay and storytelling that's found in today's games, would result in games being quite similar. I mean, think of most sci-fi media in general, most do have a basic story line of a race either defending themselves against aliens or rebelling against some intergalactic tyranny...

true
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but wasn't that the reason why in Europe SF64 is called Lylat Wars, because there was a previous game with the title SF?

Regardless, © Nintendo stays put.

Yeah, I'm pretty sure you're right

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