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Colonization of Space, and/or Other Planets


Guest Julius Quasar

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Guest Julius Quasar

Here we're gonna discuss colonization of other planets.

There's

Venus: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonization_of_Venus

Mars: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonization_of_Mars

Our Moon: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colonization_of_the_Moon

and scientists have even found a planet millions of light years away that's just like ours, except bigger, heavier gravity, forgot what it's called.

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That's amazing! :) I wonder if there are humans over there. And they would be stronger due to the gravity change.

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Guest Julius Quasar

That's amazing! :) I wonder if there are humans over there. And they would be stronger due to the gravity change.

I wonder that myself...they would definitely be stronger than us, and smaller, due to the heavier gravity.

Major problem with living on Venus: even if we cleaned up the air and got water to the surface, terraforming and stuff, a typical Venusian day lasts 243 Earth days.  :facepalm:

Major problem with Mars: weaker gravity than Earth's, and the Magnetosphere itself is weak too.

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Guest FoXXX

I wonder that myself...they would definitely be stronger than us, and smaller, due to the heavier gravity.

There might be anthros over there! :D

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That's also a good point. The gravity does shape our bone structure some. I imagined it like DBZ where they went to another planet, and Goku had to spend a whole season training (Like always) just so he could match their strength in that gravity. But It would be cool if they weren't that far away, and didn't want to rule us so we could be friend planets! :D

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That's amazing! :) I wonder if there are humans over there. And they would be stronger due to the gravity change.

I doubt, DOUBT that there are 'humans'

out there. HumaNOIDS - however - that

is a highly possible reality. I highly doubt

that 'we are alone' cliché.

As for colonization, I will list my postion on

these:

Moon: Low gravity will make expeditions to other

planets easier. Some resources could be gained, but

not as much as on a planet. Of course a colony will

be benefical.

Mars: This is the most potential target for human colonization -

or so it has been set as. I doubt we find any life beyond

plants and microbes, BUT, water has been found. With the

proper threatment, it will be possible for us to drink it.

Venus: Trying to colonize this will be... Hard as heck-land.

Not only we are facing with an hostile environment, we are

facing an hostile atmosphere, which makes it so that hardly

any thing can enter the planet. Imagine it as if 'Venus' was a

real-life equivalent of 'Venom' - exept that we do not have the

technology to clean/colonize the world... yet. Still, I doubt we

will be able to colonize Venus soon. Currently, the moon, mars,

and others, are much more valuable to us.

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Gravity also has to do with life-span, so I hear. The lower the gravity is, the less stress there is on your systems, the longer you live?

Of course, that's what I hear. :P

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Gravity also has to do with life-span, so I hear. The lower the gravity is, the less stress there is on your systems, the longer you live?

Of course, that's what I hear. :P

Hmmmm... Stronger, faster, shorter, closer-to-death-er.... Yeah that sounds about right! :) lol

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Guest Julius Quasar

Gravity also has to do with life-span, so I hear. The lower the gravity is, the less stress there is on your systems, the longer you live?

Of course, that's what I hear. :P

Probably, I heard the same stuff.

It is unknown whether Martian gravity can support human life in the long term (all experience is at either ~1g or zero gravity). Space medicine researchers have theorized on whether the health benefits of gravity rise slowly or quickly between weightlessness and full Earth gravity. One theory is that sleeping chambers built inside centrifuges would minimize the health problems. The Mars Gravity Biosatellite experiment was due to become the first experiment testing the effects of partial gravity, artificially generated at 0.38 g to match Mars gravity, on mammal life, specifically on mice, throughout the life cycle from conception to death.[23] However, in 2009 the Biosatellite project was cancelled due to lack of funds.

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Gravity also has to do with life-span, so I hear. The lower the gravity is, the less stress there is on your systems, the longer you live?

Of course, that's what I hear. :P

Somewhat correct. The main issue in low-0 gravity is that your bones wear out really fast. Excersise slows it down, but your bones are gone your buggered. Low gavity is also very hazardous, with minor accidents like spils or even blowing your razor can be massive issues.

Then there is the little things. In 0g/very low g theres the dismemberment nightmares and no sex.

As for 'being alone'. You fail to grasp the shear size of space, we are an ant in an endless desert hoping one day to find another ant

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Guest Julius Quasar

I heard Venus is full of poisonus gases, and terraforming sounds impossible.

Well...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraforming_of_Venus

(I see what you mean though)

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Venus I highly doubt can be terraformed by any reasonable means. The only thing going for it is the similar size to Earth. You could theoretically destroy that asshole of an atmosphere it has with EXTREEEEEME Ozone layer destroying technuiqes, but hell we would probably have an easier time with Mars.

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Ugh Venus is too close to the sun, we'd all roast. :shock:

Venus is moreso hot because of its atmosphere than its proximity to the sun. Much like the main reason Mars is so cold is its mostly-lacking atmosphere.

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Guest Julius Quasar

Venus I highly doubt can be terraformed by any reasonable means. The only thing going for it is the similar size to Earth. You could theoretically destroy that asshole of an atmosphere it has with EXTREEEEEME Ozone layer destroying technuiqes, but hell we would probably have an easier time with Mars.

I'll say...

I prefer Mars.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraforming_of_Mars

"Quaid!  Start the reactor!"  :lol:

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I'll say...

I prefer Mars.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terraforming_of_Mars

"Quaid!  Start the reactor!"  :lol:

Mars actually has a very simple solution, if we could ever figure out how to do it: restabalize its magnetic field. A theory is that waaay back when, a huge meteor of some sort hit Mars and destabalized its magnetic field, which over the millenia caused its atmosphere to dissipate. It is very likely that at one time Mars was an Earth-like planet. Once you stabalize the field, and cultiuvate plantlife to convert CO2 into oxygen, the terraforming of Mars is well underhand.

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Mars actually has a very simple solution, if we could ever figure out how to do it: restabalize its magnetic field. A theory is that waaay back when, a huge meteor of some sort hit Mars and destabalized its magnetic field, which over the millenia caused its atmosphere to dissipate. It is very likely that at one time Mars was an Earth-like planet. Once you stabalize the field, and cultiuvate plantlife to convert CO2 into oxygen, the terraforming of Mars is well underhand.

It's a very relative simplicity mind you. Terraforming a planet ain't an easy task no matter which way you cut it. Still gots thousand of years and countless million dollars to go before we'd actually see any progress at all. Anyway, guess we'll have to start somewhere if it's ever going to get done. *spits into hands and rubs them together.*

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Guest Julius Quasar

Mars actually has a very simple solution, if we could ever figure out how to do it: restabalize its magnetic field. A theory is that waaay back when, a huge meteor of some sort hit Mars and destabalized its magnetic field, which over the millenia caused its atmosphere to dissipate. It is very likely that at one time Mars was an Earth-like planet. Once you stabalize the field, and cultiuvate plantlife to convert CO2 into oxygen, the terraforming of Mars is well underhand.

There you go! :yes:

It's a very relative simplicity mind you. Terraforming a planet ain't an easy task no matter which way you cut it. Still gots thousand of years and countless million dollars to go before we'd actually see any progress at all. Anyway, guess we'll have to start somewhere if it's ever going to get done. *spits into hands and rubs them together.*

D'oh!  :facepalm:

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Was that really deserving of a facepalm? Confused-2.gif

Whenever you "D'oh", You have to facepalm. It's like a necessity! :) No matter how big or small. Lol

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Guest Julius Quasar

Was that really deserving of a facepalm? Confused-2.gif

Oh, no, I'm sorry, I wasn't meaning  :facepalm: in THAT context (i.e. upset at you for something you said), I was just face-palming at the facts in your statement, i.e.  :facepalm: = frustrated over the fact it would take a long time to terra form.  I wasn't  :facepalm: at YOU.  O_o

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Oh, no, I'm sorry, I wasn't meaning  :facepalm: in THAT context (i.e. upset at you for something you said), I was just face-palming at the facts in your statement, i.e.  :facepalm: = frustrated over the fact it would take a long time to terra form.  I wasn't  :facepalm: at YOU.  O_o

Now that's a relief!XD-2.gif

It's going to take an awful long time. Some years ago, I read an article on the subject in a science magazine, with an estimated deadline on how long it would take to make Mars fully habitable of around 250 000 years. Been a long time since I read it though, so it might actually have been 2 500 000 years. Other estimates vary from as little as 50 years, to as much as 100 millions. In any case, I seriously doubt it'll be in our lifetime. It'll be our future descendants that'll be able to appreciate the work we put down for them.

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