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Found 6 results

  1. Buying the SNES Classic

    Like many of the devoted faithful, I and many others woke up bright and early the morning of the 29th to line up at Toys 'R Us to get a chance at buying a vaunted SNES Classic. My roommates and I piled into my roommate's beleagured old Volvo, and arrived at 8AM sharp, finding a line that was already stretching back to the entrance of the adjoining Baby's R Us. It was a chill fall morning, and I offered multiple times to leave my spot in line to run to the Wawa a block away for some coffee and donuts. Everyone else was good, apparently. In front of us, a fashionably dressed mother attempted to explain to her equally well-dressed children why she was "buying a toy for herself". It vaguely dawned on me as to whether or not those kids would even comprehend the games on the SNES Classic as even being video games as they knew them. If those games were relatively primitive and obtuse to me growing up in the early 2000s, I can only imagine how incomprehensibly primitive they must look to fresh modern audiences. Or perhaps not so primitive, given the massive revival in sidescrollers and 8-bit gaming. Who's to say? Behind us, a rather grizzled scalper in a ratty sports coat and faded Pokémon tee. We'll call him Al, totally not after the villain from Toy Story 2. Al moaned loudly about Target's "bullsh*t" policy of only allowing one console per customer, and droned on about his console collection-2 of every console from the NES onwards in the box, the entire TurboGrafix 16 library, and was currently on the hunt for a "third" Model 1 Sega CD. When I asked how much of those he used, he seemed rather puzzled. "I just emulate them", he said, cocking his head to the side. Quite a character. As the hour went on, more and more people began to show. Rare sightings of the elusive inhabitantis cellarium were made. Young and old queued up in a line that reached almost to the Wawa a block away. It was hard to tell if the young kids were dragging their parents along, or their parents were dragging their kids along. Attire ranged from stained graphic tees to Louis Vuitton, and there was a trio cosplaying as the Mario Bros. and Princess Peach. Finally the manager of the store walked out, congratulated all who showed, and quietly began handing out tickets to purchasers before admitting them into the store. Just as it seemed there was enough to go around, a twenty-something in a black S550 and matching suit hurried into the back of the line, only to be greeted with a glum look on the manager's face. He walked off silently, tail between his legs, and everyone began to sort into the store. I probably wasn't the only one holding their breath, anticipating a storm. As someone who hadn't set foot in a Toys 'R Us in a good decade and a half, there was a weird feeling of nostalgia mixed with a feeling of being out of place. Fidget spinners, drones, and My Little Pony merch sat alongside the Rubik's Cubes, RC cars, and Pokémon cards, bringing back some nostalgia and relief that nostalgia is still being made. My reminiscence was short lived, however, as the line moved forward at record speed. My roommate almost snatched the holy object out of the cashier's hands, and it was back to the dorms in a flash. No time was wasted setting the diminutive console up. I really can't emphasize how tiny this thing is-it's exactly the size of an NES cartridge and weighs about as much. My roommate immediately booted up Super Metroid, and marveled at the quality of the graphics and sound. I got about 30 minutes of gameplay in myself, playing through Corneria in Star Fox in order to unlock Star Fox 2. Overall, it's mostly similar to the ROM that has been available over the internet since the late '90s. The dialogue and font are perhaps the biggest changes (similar to the footage shown at CES 1995, before the game was officially canned), and I'm sure someone will weep for the loss of "Expert Mode" on the main menu. Lock-on targetting seems to be missing, making space battles a bit more of a hassle. To this day, it remains my favorite title in the series, and continues to fascinate and entertain every time. The graphics scale nicely to modern HD sets, and a pseudo-CRT filter is provided for those that desire a more retro experience. Definitely better than plugging an original Super Nintendo via composite, but the scanline filter seemed a bit strong compared to the original equipment on an actual CRT. The sound is a perhaps a bit more crisp than the original hardware, but it still has the rich warmth and deep bass that we know and love. Super Mario World is airy and pleasant, Super Metroid envelopes you in dark, skin-crawling synths, and Star Fox carries a lot of punch and images fantastically. Frame-rates are at least as good as the original games, perhaps a bit smoother with the benefits of modern tech. Overall, it's definitely on par with a good emulator or the Virtual Console platform, and whether or not it's worth buying is entirely up to you. For what it is, you're getting an officially licensed Nintendo product with a good $800 worth of games and no aging equipment to worry about. That's 10x the Classic's MSRP, and roughly 4x what the ballsiest scalpers are demanding online. Sadly, Nintendo's limited it to just one product run of course, so the average consumer looking to relive their childhood or get into retrogaming will probably have to look elsewhere. All in all, nice piece of kit if you can get it.
  2. The biggest impact the Star Fox franchise's had on the gaming world, hands down, was introducing gamers to the realm of 3D-rendered polygons in the original Star Fox title back in 1993. This was arguably the start of the biggest transition to ever occur in the history of gaming, freeing us from the shackles of sidescroller hell to let us explore open worlds at our heart's content. At the core (literally) of the game was the chip that made it all possible-the Super FX chip, which managed to math it's way into overclocking the Super Nintendo's processors. Developed by a small third-party company, Argonaut Software, it allowed for the system to run at an estimated 40x faster than the original specifications would permit. This permitted the Super Nintendo to render basic 3D polygons, allow for parallax-scrolling sprites, and even apply basic texture maps to polygons. This little wonderchip found it's way into several other major titles-Super Mario World 2: Yoshi's Island, Doom, Star Fox 2 (oh what could've been!). However, by the time these games were making it to market, Sony had already ushered in an entirely new generation of gaming with the Playstation, which could provide graphics and sounds that were lightyears ahead of what even the best Super FX titles could produce. The sudden appearance of the Playstation is what led to the untimely cancellation of Star Fox 2, as Nintendo feared that it and other Super FX titles would be negatively compared against their Playstation equivalents, and that their efforts would be better spent on developing 3D games for the N64. This is a really fascinating video, and goes into great detail about the chip, Star Fox, and the rise and fall of Argonaut. Props to LoneWolf for digging this up!
  3. The Star Fox Continuity Thread!

    So with Zero here and out and an all new timeline established both familiar and different to what we already know, I figure it'd be fun if we collaborated on organizing the unique differences between each (as well as the similarities). I'm only listing what I know, so comment on what I forget or miss and I'll add it! The SNES Canon: Material Included: Starfox, Starfox 2, Nintendo Power Comic, Starfox Manual Storyline Highlights: -James is known as "Fox Sr.", Fox is known as "Fox Jr.". -Star Wolf exists in Starfox 2; unsure if this applies any of their backstory from 64 though (Pigma's betrayal, etc) -Andross was raised by CYBORG PIGS, has a robot pig adjutant named Herbert (the comic was weird) -Andross also was in love with Fox's mother, Vixy, and accidentally killed her with a car bomb meant for James/Fox Sr -James/Fox Sr. died when transporting an experimental weapon that exploded, most likely booby trapped by Andross. -Andross was banished to Venom after an experiment of his caused a natural disaster on Corneria -Andross discovered ancient technology on Venom and used it to create his army alongside recruiting/enslaving/mind controlling the native reptile inhabitants -Fara, Fay and Miyu are exclusive to this canon. Honorable mention goes to Algy (Was he meant to be Andrew or his own character?) -Andross dies a LOT in this canon. (Once at the end of Starfox, then THREE times in the post-game comic, then a fifth time in Starfox 2!) -Venom is terraformed in Starfox 2; may have been green before Andross's arrival (the comic suggests it was barren, the manual says Andross polluted it) -Sector Y is a "space ocean" full of aquatic themed animals; Sector X and Z are just debris fields orbit Corneria -Macbeth is a volcanic planet with a hollow interior. Titania is a frozen planet (that or Doctor Hangar's weather controller made it frozen?) -Locations unique to the SNES canon are Meteor, the Black Hole, Out of this Dimension, Eladard, and Astropolis. -Star Fox start out as bandits who raid Andross' armies, illustrating them as a Robin Hood against a corrupt empire; the greater implication is that Venom and Corneria are opposing super powers fighting across the Lylat system. -The Arwing is experimental technology that Starfox was asked to use; it did not exist previously. -There is no "Original Starfox" before Fox/Falco/Slippy/Peppy; James/Fox Sr. was a Cornerian pilot -Starfox's ages are different than other canons: Fox and Falco are in their mid20s and Peppy only in his 30s. Slippy is still 18, however. -The Arwing has a mecha form in Starfox 2 The 64 Canon: Material Included: Starfox 64, Starfox 64 Player's Guide, Farewell Beloved Falco Comic, Starfox Adventures, Starfox Assault, Starfox Command Storyline Highlights: -Introduces Beltino, James as "James", and the "G1" Starfox team along with Pigma's betrayal -Andross before the war seems much more sinister, having once reduced Lylat to a "wasteland of near extinction" -Andross is again banished to Venom but the ruins this time seem to be ancient instead of advanced. -Andross' army consists mostly of apes instead of reptiles -Unique major characters are Krystal, Panther, Dash, Amanda, and Lucy. -Introduces other species beyond Lylatians: Anglars and Aparoids -Introduced the Landmaster tank and Blue Marine -Andross has a more tangible, physical form in this canon compared to others -Unique locations are Katina, Aquas, and Solar. -Sector Y and Z are different from the SNES canon: rather than a space ocean and a construction yard, they are merely massive radioactive nebulae and space graveyards. -Fichina is erroneously called Fortuna in SF64. This is remedied in Assault. -Solar appears to be a red dwarf in SF64, but is changed to a yellow or orange dwarf in Command. This is retroactively applied to SF643D as well. The truth is though Solar is not a star at all, but merely a molten planet like Macbeth is in the SNES canon. -(WIP!)
  4. Hope I'm in the right place (incoming noob)! Well, I heard all the SF-O Casts available and the 1st part called my attention especially because of its soundtrack. Can anybody send me the soundtrack used in part 1? It just enchants me... It can be a link or just attach it to the post. Thanks!
  5. 20 Years of StarFox Album

    I have been working in this 20-track album to celebrate the 20th year of the release of Starfox(SFC;SNES)and i thought that SF-O would be an ideal place to share it. Regardless of what you might be thinking this is not a Remix album(that means i did not added anything to the songs, that was not the goal), i based this songs on non-ripped midi files i found on the internet so proper credits are given to the sequencers that made this possible in the mp3 description. The goal of the album was to make the songs the most equal possible to the original music. I am by no means a Pro in music production, nevertheless i did this with legit software because i'm going to study music production in a few months. The Album is compressed in a .7z file that can be opened with 7-Zip. A few rules about the album: 1° You MAY NOT post or upload this album anywhere else without my permission. 2° You MAY NOT burn this in a CD/DVD disc. 3° You MAY NOT use any of this songs for videos, flash games.etc without asking me for permission and giving credits to Nintendo Co., Ltd. 4° NO, You MAY NOT upload this to YouTube or other video/music sites.(except if is a video featuring the music with the respective permission) 5° You(obviously) MAY NOT make any profit with this album or songs.(this one goes with rule #3) I think that's mostly it. So here's the Link to the album: 20 Years of Starfox ENJOY!! Remember I DO NOT OWN any of this songs, Nintendo OWNS StarFox franchise and all of its music. P.S. I made some last-minute tweaks to a couple of songs.
  6. Ruku's Starfox Remixes

    Sup Everyone? I'm new here but It's great to have found a place filled with fellow SF fans - that said... Just a quick beat made around the Continue Jingle from the original Starfox. Hope y'like. ZokkouSTARFOX (Youtube) ZokkouSTARFOX (SOUNDCLOUD) SOURCE: Continue-StarFox